I Can Haz UDRP?


(Photo credits: vaXzine)

Many of you are probably aware of cybersquatting, it is an act by which someone registers a domain that includes a trade mark of another person in hope of reselling it at a profit to the trade mark owner or just harming him somehow. One of the obvious solutions to this problem is to take court action against the cybersquatter, but this is not always possible when you do not have enough funds to litigate or if the cybersquatter is a resident of another country. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the body responsible for generic top level domain names (gTLDs), introduced in 1998 a powerful procedure called the Uniform Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP) which lets a rightful trade mark owner transfer the domain to himself without having to resort to court.

The UDRP may cost as little as $1000 and can be used by trademark owners from anywhere in the world against cybersquatters found in any country as long as the case involves a gTLD such as .COM, .NET, and .ORG. All domain name registration contracts include a clause that allows the domain name regisrar to transfer the domain name to another person if the a decision was made with that effect through the UDRP.

UDRP can be carried out by a number of providers approved by ICANN, the most popular of these is WIPO. You do not need to travel to apply to use the procedure provided by any of these providers and all you have to do is mail then documents they need.

If you have been approached by a cybersquatter, you may wish to use the UDRP instead of succumbing to the demands of the cybersquatter or resorting to litigation as long as the domain in question is a gTLD (e.g. .COM). In order to succeed in under the UDRP you have to establish the following:

  1. The domain name is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark in which you have rights.
  2. The domain name registrant does not have any rights or legitmate interests in respect of the domain name; and
  3. The domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

The UDRP was created to address blatant cases of domain name cybersquatting, so if a domainer simply bought a domain name that includes your trade mark just in hope to sell it back to you at a profit then that is a classical UDRP case, however, the issue might not be as obvious when there are competing rights such as the case where a person genuinely uses a domain to trade under his own business or when that person is using the domain name to criticise the trade mark owner’s business.

If you think you can easily prove the requirements above then you should use the UDRP to stop the cybersquatter and get that domain. Using the UDRP is pretty simple, to use it you first have to select which provider to go to from ICANN’s list of approved providers, the prices of these differ and each of them have some additional rules for the procedure. Once you select the provider you will have to provide a written complaint specifying the reasons why you think the domain name is identical, why you think that the registerant does not have any rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name, and then why you think that it is was used in bad faith.

The burden of proof is on you in regard of all the items mentioned above as long as the evidence to establish these is not difficult to retrieve, in that case you can make it clear to the provider that you cannot acquire the evidence you need and just submit all the information you have. When submitting this application, you may decide to have a three member panel instead of the default one member panel to examine to your case. If you make that decision you will have to pay additional costs for the extra panel members, otherwise you will just have to pay for a single panelist.

Once your complaint is made, WIPO or any other provider you choose will contact the domain owner, he will have 20 days to submit a response. If you have not asked for a three member panel, the respondent may ask for it, if he does, he will have to pay for one of the panelists and you will have to pay for two. However, most cases are in fact just examined by a single panelist.

The panel will then look into the submissions and make a decision accordingly, upon reaching a conclusion, the panel may order to have the domain name suspended, transferred to you, or simply refuse the complaint. If the panel thinks that you have made the complaint in bad faith it might make a statement of reverse domain name hijacking (RDNH) which could limit your chances of applying for a UDRP in the future.

If the panel decides in your favor, the domain name registrar will have 10 days to transfer the domain to you (or suspend it depending on what you asked for) EXCEPT if the respondent goes to court within that period, but this is very unlikely because of the high costs associated with it especially when the parties are located in different countries.

The UDRP is one of the most powerful and effective dispute procedures found online because it is fast, cheap, and self-executing as it does not require going to court or any eforncement agency to actually make the transfer because the registrar (and not just the respondend) is bound by his contract with ICANN to enforce the decision.

It is worth noting that, unlike the court litigation, it is not possible to acquire any sort of damages through the UDRP. If this is what you seek, then you will have to go to court.

Many criticise the UDRP for its inconsistent decisions, lack of an appeal system, short time limits which are unfair to respondents, and theits unfounded expansion into areas of personal names and geographical names which were never inteded to be within its scope.

It is worth noting that disputes relating to the .OM ccTLD are expected be governed through a slightly amended UDRP that will only be provided by WIPO. This was mentioned in the public consultation paper concerning the .OM framework issued by the TRA a number of months ago.

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